Friday Farm Day 4  

EnigmaInitiative 53F  
3109 posts
1/7/2022 5:58 am
Friday Farm Day 4

Friday Farm Day
Friday Farm Day 2
Friday Farm Day 3

Happy Friday Farm Day all!

First, disclaimers as per my usual:

I do not live on a farm, I just like the alliteration of the title.

I grow everything from seed with the exception of some berries, banana, and orange tree. I'm growing organic, without the use of pesticides or fertilizer beyond compost.

This is my first year growing food, or anything really, successfully.

I am in growing/hardiness zone 9B

If you look up hardiness zones in your area on a search engine, it will be easy to find yours. You're going to need this information if you want to grow anything outside in your area. The United States, Canada, and the U.K. provide easy to read hardiness/growing zone maps. These indicate where a plant is capable of growing by providing the lowest minimum temperature a plant can withstand.

First up, I wanted to show you the bane of my existence, the ducks. This is just a few, some days my yard is full



Next is our Spanish Thyme/Cuban Oregano/Indian Borage/French Thyme scientific name: Coleus amboibicus. It is a semi succulent with a pungent oregano like flavor and odor. (In botany, succulent plants, also known as succulents, are plants with parts that are thickened, fleshy, and engorged, usually to retain water in arid climates or soil conditions.) To be honest with you all, I don't enjoy the taste, but I do like the way it looks, especially those purple flowers.



Here you'll see Beni Houshi Mizuna, a newly developed Japanese heirloom with mild, tender leaves atop succulent stems. These stems have the same protective phytonutrients found in blueberries. I've had them in salads, but they are most likely to be found in my morning smoothie.



New Zealand Spinach is a flowering plant in the fig-marigold family. It is a widespread species, native to eastern Asia, Australia, and New Zealand. And, grows pretty well in our backyard. It tastes kinda like spinach, but milder. She's a new seedling, give her time to grow.



That's all the pics of plants I have for you today. However, I did want to talk with you all a little about my practice of composting in place. While I do have a compost pile, in a garbage can drilled with holes, I only use that for when I have spent whole plants and leaves that need time to break down that I don't feel like cutting down myself.

What I typically do is set aside all of my off cuts, peels, and produce that's gone bad in a container that I keep on my counter. Gathering those up, I divvy them up and bury them under where I'm going to plant by digging a hole in the ground, throwing in the off cuts, throwing some soil on top, and planting in that area. Or, if I'm planting I a planter, I put some leaves and other plant matter in the bottom and a few shreds of paper (I usually just use spent toilet paper rolls), soil on top of that and plant.

Additionally, when leaves are spent/brown on a plant, I typically just pull them off and drop them right there. Mother Nature does her thing and breaks it down, feeding the plants around it.

I did the whole compost pile, turning and watering every few days when I first started. That grew old fast in the middle of a Florida summer. So, this method was born out of research and a little trial and error.

There is another method of making homemade compost tea which smells to high heaven, but is greatly enjoyed by my plants. And, that is that I pull up all my weeds, stick them in a container, cover it all in water, and make sure to put a lid on it. Let that sit for a few days and use my watering can to dip into the tea, and water my plants with it.

Oh okay, one more picture just because I'm excited by how many flowers are showing up in my orange tree. It's going to be a stellar year for oranges in this household!



I hope you've enjoyed this slightly educational tour of my garden and gardening practices.

We'll see you next week!

This week's HNW: Pink/Hearts (Or Chocolate) is available on the other side.


EnigmaInitiative 53F  
6054 posts
1/7/2022 5:59 am

Happy Friday Farm Day all!

First, disclaimers as per my usual:

I do not live on a farm, I just like the alliteration of the title.

I grow everything from seed with the exception of some berries, banana, and orange tree. I'm growing organic, without the use of pesticides or fertilizer beyond compost.

This is my first year growing food, or anything really, successfully.

I am in growing/hardiness zone 9B

If you look up hardiness zones in your area on a search engine, it will be easy to find yours. You're going to need this information if you want to grow anything outside in your area. The United States, Canada, and the U.K. provide easy to read hardiness/growing zone maps. These indicate where a plant is capable of growing by providing the lowest minimum temperature a plant can withstand.

First up, I wanted to show you the bane of my existence, the ducks. This is just a few, some days my yard is full

Next is our Spanish Thyme/Cuban Oregano/Indian Borage/French Thyme scientific name: Coleus amboibicus. It is a semi succulent with a pungent oregano like flavor and odor. (In botany, succulent plants, also known as succulents, are plants with parts that are thickened, fleshy, and engorged, usually to retain water in arid climates or soil conditions.) To be honest with you all, I don't enjoy the taste, but I do like the way it looks, especially those purple flowers.

Here you'll see Beni Houshi Mizuna, a newly developed Japanese heirloom with mild, tender leaves atop succulent stems. These stems have the same protective phytonutrients found in blueberries. I've had them in salads, but they are most likely to be found in my morning smoothie.

New Zealand Spinach is a flowering plant in the fig-marigold family. It is a widespread species, native to eastern Asia, Australia, and New Zealand. And, grows pretty well in our backyard. It tastes kinda like spinach, but milder. She's a new seedling, give her time to grow.

That's all the pics of plants I have for you today. However, I did want to talk with you all a little about my practice of composting in place. While I do have a compost pile, in a garbage can drilled with holes, I only use that for when I have spent whole plants and leaves that need time to break down that I don't feel like cutting down myself.

What I typically do is set aside all of my off cuts, peels, and produce that's gone bad in a container that I keep on my counter. Gathering those up, I divvy them up and bury them under where I'm going to plant by digging a hole in the ground, throwing in the off cuts, throwing some soil on top, and planting in that area. Or, if I'm planting I a planter, I put some leaves and other plant matter in the bottom and a few shreds of paper (I usually just use spent toilet paper rolls), soil on top of that and plant.

Additionally, when leaves are spent/brown on a plant, I typically just pull them off and drop them right there. Mother Nature does her thing and breaks it down, feeding the plants around it.

I did the whole compost pile, turning and watering every few days when I first started. That grew old fast in the middle of a Florida summer. So, this method was born out of research and a little trial and error.

There is another method of making homemade compost tea which smells to high heaven, but is greatly enjoyed by my plants. And, that is that I pull up all my weeds, stick them in a container, cover it all in water, and make sure to put a lid on it. Let that sit for a few days and use my watering can to dip into the tea, and water my plants with it.

Oh okay, one more picture just because I'm excited by how many flowers are showing up in my orange tree. It's going to be a stellar year for oranges in this household!

I hope you've enjoyed this slightly educational tour of my garden and gardening practices.

We'll see you next week!

This week's HNW: Pink/Hearts (Or Chocolate) is available on the other side.


mc_justmc 62M  
6929 posts
1/7/2022 6:20 am

A lot of those herbs would taste great in a serving of Duck.....just sayin'


EnigmaInitiative replies on 1/7/2022 3:38 pm:
If I could get myself to kill one, sure. But, see, mc, I'm a big ole softie who can barely kill an insect.

CleavageFan4U 65M  
69374 posts
1/7/2022 6:27 am

I too have a compost container kept in the kitchen for coffee grounds, vegetable and fruit trimmings, etc. It gets emptied into my composting barrel once a week or so. That black plastic barrel heats up pretty well in the Kansas sun even in winter and does a good job of reducing the contents. I add in yard clippings from another container periodically to maintain a good "brown to green" contents ratio. In the spring, the barrel gets emptied on to the garden and turned in to the soil.

The End of the Crackberry
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EnigmaInitiative replies on 1/7/2022 3:39 pm:
I've looked into those tumblers, a wee bit outside my price range for now.

The compost in place seems to work out well.

Paulxx001 65M  
22616 posts
1/7/2022 6:32 am

Hardiness? πŸ€” Hang on a sec...
Nope, it's flaccid. πŸ˜Άβ—β—


EnigmaInitiative replies on 1/7/2022 3:40 pm:
Sounds like a personal problem

pal334 67M  
45821 posts
1/7/2022 6:41 am

Staying secure. Fully involved, I like seeing such forward activity

Please cum visit my blog,,,,,,,,,,,,pal334



EnigmaInitiative replies on 1/7/2022 3:40 pm:
Thanks, great compliment coming from you.

staci_19702 51T  
3767 posts
1/7/2022 7:09 am

Those look great!
I think you should dress the ducks up like little farmers. Oh! Little straw hats!

Have a great day! πŸ’‹
Staci


EnigmaInitiative replies on 1/7/2022 3:40 pm:
Thanks

LOL...if I could catch the little fuckers.

author51 59F  
130009 posts
1/7/2022 7:13 am

You learn something new every day and I just did on your farm tour my friend..Love the photos and found the Japanese heirloom plant interesting. You had me at spinach though as it is one of my favourites.Thanks for the tour Farmer Enig.lol. xoxo


EnigmaInitiative replies on 1/7/2022 3:41 pm:
It's a pretty cool little plant, that's for sure.

Thanks

spunkycumfun 61M/67F  
41166 posts
1/7/2022 7:21 am

I enjoy your gardening tours.
Do the ducks behave in your garden?


EnigmaInitiative replies on 1/7/2022 3:41 pm:
Thank you, I enjoy talking about my garden.

The ducks eat my plants and shit and piss every fucking where.

crosstraining 69T  
8367 posts
1/7/2022 9:25 am

Lovely , thanks for the tour , XOXO


EnigmaInitiative replies on 1/7/2022 3:42 pm:
Thanks, I enjoy talking about it.

chrissy20073 63T
315 posts
1/7/2022 9:47 am

all your plants look really good love watching things grow I planted some orange seeds from an orange couple years ago they are now about 3 feet tall cant belive that they took off like that maybe get some oranges some day


EnigmaInitiative replies on 1/7/2022 3:43 pm:
Here's hoping they come out tasty. Often the seeds that come from oranges are hybrids. Therefore, they rarely turn out to taste the same as the orange you ate.

Basically, it's a crapshoot. It could be good and it may be shit.

Thanks

BiSussi 61F
1405 posts
1/7/2022 10:08 am

I am jealous of you, must be a lot of work, but I am certain the rewards are priceless
Happy Friday 2 you 2

I love pussies and adore nice dicks


EnigmaInitiative replies on 1/7/2022 3:43 pm:
It is a labor of love, I enjoy it! Thanks

resant78 43M  
3326 posts
1/7/2022 10:40 am

very cool!! I share your enthusiasm for organic greens! My backyard is covered in arugula and miner's lettuce. I grow strawberries and the property has orange, plum, and apricot trees.

I don't have ducks though.


EnigmaInitiative replies on 1/7/2022 3:44 pm:
Thanks! Yeah, I've got a bunch of Arugula back here too. That was in one of the previous ones.

I wish I could plant more trees, but I'm running out of room.

jajo696 67F  
4286 posts
1/7/2022 11:36 am

Looks sooooo good Enig.

Is that ur cat food that the ducks are drawn to ? Do they chomp away at your plants? Will the cats shoo em away? im thinking....something ...something must help. Do they go into others yard like that ??

I love the purple flower thingy too...it all looks great. U green thumber you !!


EnigmaInitiative replies on 1/7/2022 3:46 pm:
They are absolutely drawn to the cat food and the water I leave out for the cats. I change that water like four times a day because the ducks are all up in it, and I don't want the cats to go without.

Thanks, I've really enjoyed this new hobby of mine, it's been like a whole new adventure.

EnigmaInitiative replies on 1/8/2022 4:52 am:
PS:No, the cats have no effect on them, often just standing right next them.

citizen4722 64M  
74582 posts
1/7/2022 11:47 am

At this rate I can see you getting your own gardening TV show
Keep up the great work.


EnigmaInitiative replies on 1/7/2022 3:47 pm:
Me? On TV? Ah hell nah.

So not me, so so not me.

People can be cruel, and I'm a sensitive soul.

I'd rather write about it here.

lonlyforlove2 79M  
32704 posts
1/7/2022 5:10 pm

all you need is a few acres to work with and the world would be a better place..

Stop by at lonlyforlove2
also see Lunch with Lonly , we get snow tomorrow
Check my blog on New Community, "A photo of my big Pecker"
also, " My Sunday afternoon with the kids'


EnigmaInitiative replies on 1/8/2022 4:53 am:
The world may not be better, but there sure would be less hungry people in any area I live in. I'm pretty big on feeding people.

CuriousHer 53F
26 posts
1/7/2022 9:26 pm

Where on earth are all those Muscovoy ducks coming from?
I love ducks, but not so much when it comes to Muscovoy ones... though they are very tasty. The meat goes well with greens, like the mizuna.

Speaking of which, I also grow mizuna, but not the purple one. I should get seeds. It's great in salads, mixed in with stir fries, etc. LOVE it! It's also ornamental, though it bolts easily in warm weather.

New Zealand spinach: Each plant spreads out quite a bit, and it can have a slightly gritty texture. I'll take chard, spinach, mizuna, or many other greens over that, though the NZ spinach can handle more heat.

Compost: my compost area is a semi-caged heap, not a fancy bin. Veggie/fruit trimmings, eggshells, egg cartons/cardboard drink carriers, etc. go in there, as do various piles of leaves. Barrels and barrels of oak leaves get used for mulch on camellias or in flower/veggie beds. Only the overflow of the oak leaves makes it into the compost pile. Spare coffee grounds from Starbucks get used in pots of fruit trees, roses, camellias, azaleas, etc. or in flower/veggie beds. Blueberries love coffee grounds and oak leaf mulch -- acidity and loamy compost make them happy.

This last couple weeks we got anti-heat-- several nights of dreaded frost. That's fine and dandy for stone fruits, but the plumerias, tomatoes, and papayas, and a few tender succulents, are very unhappy. Hope I don't lose the young, potted papaya plants. I cringe when I read posts by other bloggers digging out of inches or feet of snow, though I know you're probably used to it, and you adapt your gardening accordingly. Bet you can grow a killer crop of cherries and high-chill fruits! I'm in Mediterranean/subtropical (and getting hotter and drier by the year) So. California. Ever watch the Rose Parade? it ends less than 5 miles from my house. Every New Year's morning about 8:05am I walk out onto my driveway, next to the passionfruits, dragonfruits, etc., look up into the sky, and wave to the pilot of the B2 Stealth bomber as it flies directly overhead.

Tomorrow is the first of several fruit tree scion exchanges held by various chapters of the California Rare Fruit Growers, so I need to get up early in the morning, cut and label scions, and head out to the Inland Empire to swap small sticks with other crazy folks who graft stuff onto their fruit trees.

EnigmaInitiative -- I keep meaning to send you pix of the passionfruits. A few green fruits are still hanging on the vines.


EnigmaInitiative replies on 1/8/2022 5:01 am:
I mean, they're native to Florida, aren't they? I think they are but I'm not an expert. I've been here about 9 years, they've already been around.

The mizuna hasn't bolted yet, but we haven't been over 85 in a few weeks. I love the stuff, it's so pretty and tasty. Win win.

I have to agree on the New Zealand spinach about the grittiness, I no longer eat it plain, it's more likely to be in my smoothie.

My partner/roommate brings home his coffee grounds from work (I don't drink coffee), that goes all over my blueberries.

I feel you on the subtropical, Orlando has yet to get a frost. We haven't been lower than 50 yet this winter. No high chill fruits here.

That tree exchange sounds fun. I have yet to graft anything, but I'm eager to try.

Debbi, you can call me Debbi.

Please do send me pix, I still have green passion fruit. I'm hoping it ripens before it gets too cold.

pacnwlover42 53M  
9808 posts
1/7/2022 10:41 pm

They must be Florida redneck ducks! Love your tour of the garden.

Funny women are incredibly sexy!


EnigmaInitiative replies on 1/8/2022 5:01 am:
They probably are

Thanks pac

PonyGirl1965 56F  
22090 posts
1/7/2022 11:25 pm

The mizuna purple plants are so pretty!
I dump my debris here there and where ever. It gets covered eventually.


EnigmaInitiative replies on 1/8/2022 5:02 am:
Aren't they? I just love the look and taste/nutritional value! I'm putting more in the front yard just because they're so pretty!

I hear that, nothing wrong with letting Mother Nature do its thing.

seingalt23 57M  
5565 posts
1/8/2022 11:28 am

Good, if something bad is happening in Europe, I try to escape to Orlando.

For sure, you need someone for eating all these plants with you, I will take care of the ducks

Giacomo

Only sage is growing like crazy in my garden, I am cooking quite often Saltimbocca a la Giacomo ...


EnigmaInitiative replies on 1/8/2022 1:19 pm:
I'd feed the world, if I had enough space.

Logan0867 54M
244 posts
1/8/2022 7:51 pm

Looks like that black thumb is turning green. xxoo

Egg shells, coffe grounds and other natural food byproducts we don't eat ( banana peels, corn cobs) also make great compost material.

Also, on top of compost, anytime you boil things don't dump the water out...let it cool off and use it to water the garden. I keep a gallon water bottle by the stove to put hot water in and let it cool. Boiling eggs...save that water and use it to water the garden...all plants like calcium but apples, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, celery, cherries, citrus, conifers, cotton, curcurbits, melons, grapes, legumes, lettuce, peaches, peanuts, pears, peppers, potatoes, tobacco, and tomatoes are supposed to be especially responsive. Boiling corn on the cob...it has potassium, calcium and vitamins B2, C and K, among others so would be particularly good for veggies needing those particular minerals...as long as you don't salt the water 1st.


EnigmaInitiative replies on 1/9/2022 6:40 am:
Hey babe, yeah, I know about the other stuff. I just didn't want to type it all out.

I don't boil veggies, ever. Never ever.

I roast them, mainly.

CleavageFan4U 65M  
69374 posts
1/9/2022 6:31 am

EnigmaInitiative replies on 1/7/2022 5:39 pm:
I've looked into those tumblers, a wee bit outside my price range for now.

The compost in place seems to work out well.

*****

Mine was a gift from my son, so I don't know what is cost exactly but suspect it was TOO huge. It's a tumbler kind, maybe 40 to 50 gallon capacity (?).

I ALWAYS Miss Out on this Stuff
The End of the Crackberry
NYE Booze, on HNW
[post 3312759] My Private Post - Tell Me ALL Your Secrets – Anything you write here is just between us


EnigmaInitiative replies on 1/9/2022 6:42 am:
Yay for children giving thoughtful presents!


hotdreamer1000 62M  
12409 posts
1/10/2022 1:01 pm

The ducks may be a pain, but I expect they are quite fun too!


EnigmaInitiative replies on 1/10/2022 1:54 pm:
Oh, I have yet to see the fun in them to be honest with you.

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